SWISCO - The Replacement Hardware Authority

Replacement storm window latches and corners

A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Hi. This is my third email to you today, and I trust the effort is not burdensome. These two photographs show the type of storm windows that are installed on the house. I have a problem with some corners and latches, but I am not neither the owner of the house nor a handyman, so I am uncertain which parts are appropriate. The how-to-video clearly indicates this is a repair that I can perform. Thank you very much.

Sincerely,
Mike
User submitted photos of window hardware.
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Tom from SWISCO responded:
Thanks for posting, Mike! I actually don't see any other posts made by you on our Discussion Board. Did you use the same e-mail address? Keeping the same e-mail will help us avoid any confusion.

As for the question at hand, I cannot identify what you have based on these pictures. I will need you to take clear pictures of the hardware in question so that we can see exactly what it is you have. I will also need dimensions for each part. Thanks!
A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Thank you for responding to my emails. I sent consecutive emails to you within minutes of one another. So, I think I may not have provided enough time between messages for you to review any individual message.

I took some additional photographs of the storm window(s) I am hoping to repair. Also, I had initially thought that the Swisco 91-001 and 91-002 were comparable to the ones on the storm window(s) I am hoping to repair, but they are actually different. The Swisco 95-003 and 95-005 also do not seem appropriate for the storm windows on the house in which I reside.

I have attached several photographs of the storm window. Perhaps these photographs will aid you in discerning whether you can help. I thank you very much for your time.

Finally, as I do not have Internet access at home and use it at the local library, I am not able to respond to you as nearly as rapidly as you have to me.

Sincerely,
Mike
User submitted photos of window hardware.
A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Here is one last photograph of the type of storm window on the house and the manner in which corners are joined.

As before, I thank you very much for any assistance you are able to provide.

Sincerely,
Mike G
User submitted a photo of a storm window latch.
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Paul from SWISCO responded:
Thank you! The finger latches look like our 91-022 and 91-023. If you need the spring, we recommend the 91-102. The top tilt corners might be 95-015 and the bottom plain corners might be our 95-016, but please compare our dimensions to yours just in case. Also be sure to watch our video on how to replace this kind of corner key.
A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Dear Tom & Paul:

Thank you very much for getting back to me. First things first. Paul, I do not have a problem with the screen, but thank you nonetheless for sending the video of Mike.

Tom, I can provide dimensions for the storm windows, but the issue is more about the corners and latches. Don't mean to put you on the spot, but I actually thought that by looking at the photographs you would discern the particular type or vintage of storm window.

When you ask for dimensions, I am presuming you simply mean the length and width of the storm window, but I do not know how this will be of assistance. I tried to take the corner out of the broken storm window corner but was unable to do so, as the crimping (note the circular indentations on the storm window joints).

Finally, I will try and pry the damaged storm window corner to see if I can remove the sections of the original corners. Unfortunately, and I realize you are very busy, but I will be unable to return to the library computer until Wednesday. But I very much appreciate your assistance.

Sincerely,
Mike G
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Paul from SWISCO responded:
No, we will need to know the dimensions of the parts themselves. The video I posted shows you how to remove stamped corners for both screen and storm panels, which will allow you to measure them accurately. That is the only way we can determine what you need.
A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Paul:

Thank you for getting back to me and clarifying the nature of the video. Unfortunately, I have a problem removing the corners. Is there a tool you might recommend that will both spread and permit re-crimping?

I realize you are very busy, but I truly appreciate the assistance.

Sincerely,
Mike

PS If the corners have already broken off, how will the pieces be able to help in the diagnosis of what is needed? Also, is it reasonable to assume that all storm windows will have the same size corners, or does each storm window size have its own unique corner?
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Paul from SWISCO responded:
Sure! The tools you need are: a large flat screw driver (or chisel), a hammer, a vise, and a nail punch. If you don't have a vise, you will need to have someone hold frame while you work on it.

If you have a vise, place the frame in the vise near the corner you are working on. Place the chisel just to the opposite end of the corner behind the key and knock it out by hitting the chisel with the hammer. No need to spread the frame at all. To re-crimp, use the hammer and the nail punch.
A quick learner from Woodstock,, NY says:
Paul:

Hi. I tried removing the broken corners hoping that there was some marking of the particular size on the corner. As you probably already knew, there is no such marking. When you indicate needing to know the size, what specific dimensions are you referring to (e.g., the width of the corner or the length)?

As an aside, when drilling through the frame and the corner with a 1/8" drill, the shorter end of the corner broke off, and it was he__ getting the remaining piece out.

As always, I appreciate the assistance.

Sincerely,
Mike
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Paul from SWISCO responded:
The most important part of matching a corner is knowing the thickness and width of the corner leg. For example, the leg of our 95-015 is 5/32" thick and 3/16" wide.
A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Dear Paul:

Thank you, again, for getting back to me. With a little luck and considerable pounding, I was able to retrieve pieces of the corners. In the three photographs that follow, I was only able to have one survive the drilling and pounding. The first two photographs are meant to provide perspective and approximation of both the length and width of corner assemblies (top and/or bottom). The third one is from a bottom right corner; it was a clean break from the upright section. I believe this particular photograph provides the best perspective on the actual size of the needed parts.

As always, I appreciate your assistance and will await your response to these photographs.

Sincerely,
Mike

PS Is there a secret to getting the corners back into position without risking damage to them?
User submitted photos of a corner key.
A quick learner from Woodstock, NY says:
Dear Paul:

Hi. I measured the one full piece of an original corner in comparison to the dimension you provided. I have a thickness of 1/8" and a width of 3/16". The 95-015 appears to be just a little too thick. Given the difficulty it took to get the various pieces out, is there another size that comes closer to the 1/8" thickness?

Also, would a smaller storm window size (e.g., in a bathroom or along side of much larger living room window) be of an altogether different size relative to the dimension I measured?

Thanks again for your time.

Sincerely,
Mike Govia
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Dave from SWISCO responded:
Thanks for the additional pictures. I suggest taking a look at our 91-006 latch pair and 95-191 and 95-233 keys. See if you are happy with my suggestions. Also take note I cannot get a good look at your top tilt key. Is it straight like the 95-191, or is yours off set? Look it over and see what you think.
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